School History Trips to Explore Washington DC

School history trips to Washington DC take students to the centre of contemporary US power: the seat of the US President in the White House. It is also a city marked by its nation’s recent events, and, as such, is an excellent destination for students seeking to understand the role of the United States of America in the age after European colonialism. The National Museum of American History, the Ford’s Theatre National Historic Site, the Arlington National Cemetery and many other sites provide a full and fascinating itinerary for students.

The National Museum of American History

Belonging to the Smithsonian Institute of nineteen museums, nine research centres and a zoo in Washington DC and New York City, this museum in Washington DC is one of the foremost institutions in which students can learn about recent events in the US. Its collections encompass numerous facets of the nation’s cultural heritage, including: nearly forty prints from three government survey missions to the American West in the 19th century; Chinese American clothes from the Virginia Lee Mead Collection that provide insights into the cultural lives of Chinese immigrants; a sampling of objects that illuminate the huge Mexican presence in the US; objects relating to women mathematicians in the late 19th century, and much more. Students on school history trips to Washington DC could spend days examining the museum’s collections. It also houses special exhibits on specific items or groups of items pertaining to US cultural heritage.

Ford’s Theatre National Historic Site

The Ford’s Theatre National Historic Site preserves Ford’s Theatre and the Petersen House in Washington DC, the two sites where the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln in 1865 played out. On 14 April 1865, President Lincoln and his wife watched a performance of Our American Cousin at the theatre, during which John Wilkes Booth entered their box and shot him. The gravely injured President was carried across the road to the Petersen House, where he died the next morning. While visiting Washington DC on school history trips, students can experience these seminal events and see items associated with the assassination, including the Derringer pistol used by Booth and the coat President Lincoln was wearing on the night.

Arlington National Cemetery

The Arlington National Cemetery is a vast military cemetery where soldiers who took part in the nation’s many conflicts have been buried. It was established during the American Civil War, and saw burials from that war as well as casualties and veterans from all of the wars since, up to the current War on Terror. It is an arresting reminder for students on school history trips that the recent events in the US have been shaped by a high number of wars.

Diets for a Pear-Shaped Body

According to Marie Savard, M.D., author of the weight loss book “Apples & Pears: The Body Shape Solution for Weight Loss and Wellness,” body shape is the most powerful predictor of human health. Women with pear-shaped bodies gain weight on the hips and thighs, while their upper bodies remain slim. This is good news, in a way. Both men and women with apple-shaped bodies, who gain significant weight around the belly, are at greater risk for developing heart disease, diabetes and cancer, according to diet experts.

Determining Your Shape

If you are not sure whether you are apple-shaped or pear-shaped, there is a quick way to tell. Take a tape measure and place it around your waist. Record the figure. Then measure your hips. Divide the waist measurement number by the hip measurement number. If the total is 0.8 or lower, you have a pear-shaped body, meaning that you carry more fat around your hips and thighs. If you are pear-shaped, you’ll use a different strategy to lose weight than an apple-shaped person.

What Fat Deposits Mean

It’s important to note that people with pear-shaped bodies, who carry fat around their hips and thighs, store fat more shallowly than the deeper, visceral abdominal fat that accumulates around the organs of apple-shaped people. This means that the fat is doing less harm on your body and you will have fewer health risks. People with pear shapes simply have a different physical chemistry, hormone production and metabolism than apple-shaped folks, which means that they are at less risk for obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, heart disease and certain cancers. In fact, Dr. Savard believes that pear-zone fat is passive and actually protects against heart disease. However, pear-shaped women are prone to osteoporosis, varicose veins and cellulite and tend to have more difficulty losing weight in general.

Healthy Diet for a Pear-Shaped Body

Butter’s a no-no for pear-shaped dieters, who tend to crave salty foods.

On her website, Dr. Savard recommends that pear-shaped dieters should stick with complex carbohydrates like green vegetables and whole grains. Eat low fat; aim to get about 20 percent of your diet from healthy fats like salmon, almonds and flax seed, and use olive and canola oils. Moderate protein intake is recommended, such as chicken and lamb. Vegetarians can get their protein from brown rice, spinach, oats, lentils and black beans. The worst foods for this body type, according to Dr. Savard, are cheese, butter and salty foods. She recommends taking a calcium supplement, since osteoporosis is a risk later in life.

Body Image Issues for Pear Shapes

According to Savard, resistance training with free weights three times per week to stave off bone loss is recommended. This will also increase your metabolic rate and burn that pesky fat off over time. Approach dieting and exercise with a little less anxiety, as your excess weight is less likely to be harming you. However, post-menopausal pear-shaped women can start to experience some of the same health problems as apple-shaped women. And pear-shaped women of all ages feel self-conscious about their large buttocks and thighs, so they suffer from more eating disorders than apple-shaped women do.